Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Soundwalk Follow-up

Hello, all.

Thanks for your participation in what I'm hearing (pun intended) was a
successful series of soundwalks.

The next step is to get your Research Blog up and running so that you
can document your soundwalk experience and upload your maps, sketches,
and notes while the experience is still relatively fresh.

The Blogger tutorial is here:
http://www.glennbach.com/film_116/116_blogger.html

And the updated PantherFile tutorial is here:
http://www.glennbach.com/film_116/116_pantherfile.html

Answer the Soundwalk Response questions in a post on your Research Blog.
The questions are here:
http://www.glennbach.com/film_116/116_research.html

I will be checking that your Research Blog is live and that you've
answered the questions by this Sunday, September 14, 5 PM.

I'd also like to see your notes and maps, but, since I won't be grading
your finished Research Blog until the end of the semester, don't worry
if you're having problems scanning or uploading imagery at this point.
We will have help sessions on this issue and other topics associated
with Drift 1 on October 1 and October 8, although we can certainly help
you individually if you visit us during office hours. You can then
upload your soundwalk images when we finish troubleshooting the problem.

Okay, that's it for now. I'll probably send another note this weekend
to remind you about the Research Blog deadline.

Have a great rest of the week.

3 comments:

Tim Waite said...

Were you able to find places and spaces where you could really listen?

That was the easy part. The group I thought did great and for me the forest was the perfect spot.

Was it possible to move without making a sound?

Not really. Only if you could find a step with out woodchips or leaves. But it wasn't difficult to stand or sit still.

What happened when you plugged your ears, and then unplugged them?

There was a bit of an echo at first, but you dont realize how much sound there is all around you if you are not paying attention.

In your sound log exercise, what types of sounds were you able to hear? List them.

I heard a growling engine, loud airplanes excelling through the wind, birds calling for one another, a grass blower that had a very rough sound, and I sat around 5 bees that didn't harm me but were very loud and had a buzz sound to them.

Were you able to differentiate between sounds that had a recognizable source and those sounds you could not place?

There wasn't alot of sounds in the forest that weren't recongnizable and if there was, we clearified it with a group discussion at the end of the walk, which was really nice.

Human sounds? Mechanical sounds? Natural sounds?

Were you able to detect subtleties in the everpresent drone?

Extremely close sounds? Sounds coming from very far away?

There were basketball players playing at the court and the court must have been 70 yards away. I sware it felt like they were 10 yards. I'm not sure why that is but it was very interesting. Also, there was a really loud echo of some sort for like 5 seconds, and it was extremely annoying.

What kinds of wind effects were you able to detect (for example, the leaves of trees don't make sounds until they are activated by the wind)?

Well the example in the question is a great sound when the wind makes the trees come alive. There was also the airplane that might have doubled the sound due to the wind.

Were you able to intervene in the urban landscape and create your own sounds by knocking on a resonant piece of metal, activating wind chimes, etc.?

I threw a stone down a sewer and the echo was so nice and clear of the water splashing. It was kinda cool and fun to notice and definitly could record that sound over and over again. Also, my group threw a penny in a parking slot machine and it was a very distinct sound.

Do you feel you have a new understanding or appreciation of the sounds of our contemporary landscape/cityscape?

Absolutly, it's not that I have never heard the things that I heard on the walk, it's the understanding of how nature or the world sounds on a day to day basis.

How do you think your soundwalk experience will affect your practice as a media artist, if at all?

It's the fact that every sound matters and that every sound is different in its own way, so for me it will help my understanding as an artist to make things bigger and better, and that can all be done with sound.

T.J. Waite
film 116-401
film 116-801

Derek said...

Were you able to find places and spaces where you could really listen?

Yes, it was a very busy day and there various sounds all over the place.

Was it possible to move without making a sound?

Not really, we were in a big group and people were kind of talking and loud footsteps.

What happened when you plugged your ears, and then unplugged them?

It was a big difference. I felt like I could mainly hear sounds coming from my body when I plugged my ears and the sounds were vibrant when I unplugged.

In your sound log exercise, what types of sounds were you able to hear? List them.

- Dog collars/leashes clanging together.
- Airplanes soaring above.
- People's feet as they ran on the pavement.
- Tires screeching on the road.
- Kids laughing and yelling on the playground.
- The wind rustling the leaves and branches.

Were you able to differentiate between sounds that had a recognizable source and those sounds you could not place?

Mostly.

Human sounds? Mechanical sounds? Natural sounds?

I heard all of them. There were a lot of people around. Bikes, cars. Wind.

Were you able to detect subtleties in the everpresent drone?

What?

Extremely close sounds? Sounds coming from very far away?

Heard mostly close sounds. Far away ones mostly consisted of transportation devices.

What kinds of wind effects were you able to detect (for example, the leaves of trees don't make sounds until they are activated by the wind)?

I heard wind making noises on the water and like the example, blowing leaves.

Were you able to intervene in the urban landscape and create your own sounds by knocking on a resonant piece of metal, activating wind chimes, etc.?

Yes.

Do you feel you have a new understanding or appreciation of the sounds of our contemporary landscape/cityscape?

Yes, when we closed our eyes and listened it allowed me to take in most of the sounds that I usually subconsciously ignore.

How do you think your soundwalk experience will affect your practice as a media artist, if at all?

It will allow me to think about sounds more and how they are important to the media.

Derek said...

Derek Reilly for that last one.